Truk Stop Hotel

The Truk Stop Hotel is a PADI Resort offering great accommodations plus a full service dive center for both the recreational and technical diver.

The Truk Stop Hotel inventory of rooms includes apartments, suites, plus deluxe ocean view and standard rooms. Apartments are one bedroom, fully furnished units with kitchenette. Our suites and rooms have balconies, private bath, refrigerator, and TV/DVD player. All are well air conditioned.

Our Hotel Restaurant serves international, western style and local food daily from 6:00am till 10:00pm. We offer inside dining in air conditioned, smoke free comfort or outside on our patio. Our guests enjoy wireless broadband internet connection in the restaurant or on the patio - for free!

The Hard Wreck Café & Bar is a favorite hangout for resident expatriates, divers, and the business traveler.. It is a great place to enjoy a friendly game of pool, your favorite beverage, karaoke with friends, or just rest up for your next dive or business meeting.

 

  • Operation Hailstone Truk Lagoon Truk Lagoon is recognized as the world's greatest wreck diving destination and for good reason. More than 60 World War II Japanese war ships and aircraft were sunk during Operation Hailstone in February of 1944 and now rest peacefully on the floor of Truk Lagoon. All of these sunken monuments are accessible to the scuba diver - most at a depth suitable for the novice or sport diver.

    The Truk Lagoon is roughly 40 miles in diameter and encircles 14 major, populated islands. Weno Island is the Capitol Island of Chuuk State and home to the Truk Lagoon Dive Center. Our Truk Lagoon Map will show that the majority of these wrecks are highly concentrated in just 3 areas - all within a few miles of each other. Travel time from the Truk Stop Hotel's private dock to most of these wrecks is less than 20 minutes.

    The Truk Lagoon Dive Center offers a two tank am or morning dive then additional one or two tank dives in the afternoon. The most commonly visited or favorite wrecks chosen by divers are featured on this website.

    After a full day of diving the wrecks of Truk Lagoon you can relax while enjoying great food at the Truk Stop Hotel and Restaurant.

  • Hanakawa Maru

    Hanakawa Maru – Passenger Cargo ship sitting upright. Fuel drums, cement bags in the holds; this wreck is smothered in soft corals.

    Depth: 50-100ft/15-30m  

    The Hanakawa Maru was a 368ft/112m, 4,739-ton Passenger-Cargo Ship built in 1942 for Kawasaki Kisen Kaisha of Kobe, Japan. The poetic meaning for the name translates as ‘Flower River’. The word ‘Maru’ designates a merchant vessel. The Japanese Navy requisitioned her on October 25th 1943. Prior to Operation Hailstorm commencing on February 17th 1944, little is known of her short-lived military history.

    On February 18th 1944 two sets of 2 attack aircraft from the USS Bunker Hill and USS Monterey were arrived over Northeast Pass, broke to the north and skirted the atoll until Piannu Pass was reached. They turned north, dropping altitude as they approached Tol Island. Lying 500 yards off the southeastern end of Tol Island lay the Hanakawa Maru at anchor. Flying in column formation, the first set of planes dropped torpedoes with one torpedo hitting amidships and igniting instantaneously her aviation fuel into a massive explosion. In a moment there was nothing left except burning fuel over the surface of the water. Two more torpedoes were expended on her, although they weren’t needed - a fourth torpedo missed and hit the island, burning a fuel dock and a church. Fortunately, the priest was being held captive on Udot Island and escaped the inferno. The ship was engaged in off-loading army troops when caught by the attack. 216 crewmen and soldiers were killed aboard the ship.

    She rests on an even keel at moderate depth with the superstructure at 50ft/15m, the deck at 75ft/23m, and the sea bottom at 110ft/33m. A circular-shaped raised gun platform is mounted on the poop deck with a 4.7-inch anti-submarine short gun covered with heavy marine growth at its center. The holds contain many cement bags, and fuel drums. The steering compartment is well worth a visit. The entire ship is covered with excellent and varied marine growth with numerous brilliantly colored soft corals, sponges, and algae-type growth abounding on the wreck. The Hanakawa Maru provides an excellent dive for recreational divers, with some of the best coral growth seen here, but her remote location often combined with rough seas precludes a lot of active attention by divers.

    Hanakawa Maru

    (Excerpts reprinted with permission from World War II Wrecks of the Truk Lagoon by Dan E. Bailey)

  • Mutsuki Class Destroyer

    Fumitsuki DestroyerFumitzuki – Mutsuki Class Destroyer. Sits upright, listing to port. Extensive marine growth, many schools of fish. Stern uplifted by explosion.

    Depth: 100-130ft/30-40m

    The Fumitsuki was a Mutsuki Class Destroyer built in 1926, 320ft/97m long with a gross tonnage of 1,913 tons normal, and 1,590 tons light after reconstruction. She was driven by 2-shaft Parsons geared turbines and 4 Kampon boilers. She could carry a complement of 150 officers and crew. She was one of only two real Japanese Navy combat ships sunk in Truk Lagoon. She was capable of over 33.5 knots fully loaded, but was under repair at the time of her demise. The name translates as “the 7th month of the moon calendar when rice/flowers ripen.”

    The Fumitsuki was one of 12 vessels ordered under the new Reinforcement Program of 1923 as part of the third ‘Minekaze’ group. These new Kamikaze type destroyers were also rated as minesweepers and minelayers. Following the outbreak of war on December 7th 1941, new Fubuki class destroyers would take over the front line duties as Fleet destroyers and the Fumitsuki was retrofitted as a Mutsuki class fast transport destroyer.

    Over the next 3 years, the Fumitsuki played a very active role in Japan’s war effort. She participated in the Apparri and Lingayen (Philippines) invasion forces, the Western Java invasion force, the ‘Tokyo Express’ troop evacuations runs from Guadalcanal, the assault on Rendova Island, landings near Torokina in Bougainville, and numerous troop transport roles in support of various Japanese operations. She suffered numerous attacks and damage from aerial attacks in 1942 and 1943, including April 2, 1942 near Kavieng, October 8th 1942 off Buka, and November 2nd 1942 at Rabaul. On January 4th 1944 together with a fellow destroyer, the Fumitsuki shot down 10 enemy planes while receiving only light damage off Rabaul with a loss of 4 men killed and 20 wounded. On February 6th 1944 she arrived in Truk for repairs.

    At approximately 1430 hours on February 17th, a USS Enterprise TBF plane piloted by Ensign Jewell dropped four 500-lb bombs on her as she tried to evade. The TBF crew reported 2 direct hits and a probable third hit. The ship was engulfed in flames and began to sink and list to port. She dropped anchors, but went down by the next morning. She rests on an even keel with a slight list to port, with the deck being at 100ft/30m and the sea bottom at 125ft/38m. There is a bow gun near the forecastle, Long Lance torpedo launchers between the forecastle and bridge, and aft gun and winches, cables and depth charge throwers are on the stern. With a beam of just 30ft/9m it’s easy to imagine this sleek fast Japanese attack warship cutting through the ocean.

    (Excerpts reprinted with permission from World War II Wrecks of the Truk Lagoon by Dan E. Bailey)

  • Wreck site map

     

    Aikoku Maru Amagisan Maru Betty Bomber
    Fujikawa Maru Fujisan Maru Emily Flying Boat
    Fumitsuki Maru Gosei Maru Heian Maru
    Hoki Maru Hokuyo Maru I-169 Submarine
    Kensho Maru Kiyosumi Maru Momokawa Maru
    Nippo Maru Rio De Janerio Maru San Francisco Maru
    Sankisan Maru Seiko Maru Shinkoku Maru
    Hanakawa Maru Yamagiri Maru Unkai Maru No.6
    Nagano Maru Oite Reiyo Maru
    Hoyo Maru Yubae Maru The Lighter
  • The Truk Stop Hotel in Truk Lagoon is a PADI Resort offering great accommodations plus a full service dive center for both the recreational and technical diver.

    Truk Stop HotelThe Truk Stop Hotel inventory of rooms includes apartments, suites, plus deluxe ocean view and standard rooms. Apartments are one bedroom, fully furnished units with kitchenette. Our suites and rooms have balconies, private bath, refrigerator, and TV/DVD player. All are well air conditioned.

    Truk Stop HotelOur Hotel Restaurant serves international, western style and local food daily from 6:00am till 10:00pm. We offer inside dining in air conditioned, smoke free comfort or outside on our patio. Our guests enjoy wireless broadband internet connection in the restaurant or on the patio - for free!

    The Hard Wreck Café & Bar is a favorite hangout for resident expatriates, divers, and the business traveler.. It is a great place to enjoy a friendly game of pool, your favorite beverage, karaoke with friends, or just rest up for your next dive or business meeting.

    More about the Truk Stop Hotel

  • Truk Lagoon Dive Center has emerged as THE dive operator with the staff and resources to support your technical exploration and adventure when diving the wrecks of Truk Lagoon. Whether you want to do deep, see wrecks that very few others will ever get to see, penetrate past the point where others turn back, we have the staff and experience to take you there. Or, if you just want stay down longer and spend more time taking in the splendor of a massive World War II shipwreck we can do that too.

    Truk Lagoon Dive CenterThe Truk Lagoon Dive Center offers up to 4 dives a day. Our private dock, dive lockers, rinse tanks and shower make diving with us easy and convenient. We have Bauer Compressors and use a Haskell for blending Nitrox and Trimix. Our expatriate PADI certified instructors take care of the technical and recreational diver with equal care and consideration.

    Truk Lagoon Dive Center has a comprehensive blending station with an experienced gas blender who can provide you with any nitrox/trimix blend you require. Our Haskell Booster pump ensures little wastage of gas, enabling us to give you the best gas prices in Truk.

    Truk Lagoon Dive CenterWe are the island's only supplier of medical grade oxygen so you can be assured of a never ending supply of quality oxygen. And, we maintain a large supply of Helium (at least 60,000 liters/2,100 cu. ft.) for those who wish to minimize the effects of narcosis at deeper depths and improve decision making at any depth.

    Truk Lagoon Dive Center is rebreather friendly with 17 sets of tanks (2lt/3lt) with Buddy in line valves available for those who do not wish to bring their own. We always have sofnolime 797 available.

    At Truk Lagoon Dive Center we also teach technical diving - we don't sell certificates. Our emphasis and objective is to help you develop the attitude, judgment, confidence and skills needed to dive safely at an advanced level - not merely the issuance of certification cards.

    We are a TDI training facility and our certified instructors have experience in diving deep wrecks, walls and caves. Here in Truk lagoon we can offer you ‘the diving everyone else dreams about!’

    Courses and cost listed below include all required materials and equipment but exclude the cost of oxygen, helium, and diving. It you are already traveling to Truk to dive, combine any of these courses with your scheduled diving and save money!

    More information about the Truk Lagoon Dive Center

     

  • WWII shipwrecks

    Aikoku Maru – Converted passenger freighter, sitting upright, with fore ship destroyed. AA guns, huge stern gun and personal artifacts.

    Depth: 80-210ft/24-64m

    Aikoku MaruThe Aikoku Maru was 498ft/151m, 10,437-ton ship originally designed as a large passenger-cargo ship for Osaka Shosen K.K. and completed on August 31st 1941. The word ‘Maru’ designates a merchant vessel. As part of the Japanese Navy’s secret mobilization plan for wartime acquisitions, the Aikoku Maru was requisitioned by the Japanese Navy immediately following its completion, secretly chosen to form ‘Sentai 24’ with two sister ships and they were given the mission to attack enemy lines of communication and destroy commercial shipping. She and her two sister ships were Japan’s best, able to cruise at 17 knots and out-distance most ships of her time. She was painted with a dazzle camouflage configuration designed to break up sharp angles, minimize the contrast of light and shadow, hide the bow wave, making it appear shorter and slower, and thereby confusing any observer as to its heading by eliminating its shape from its background.

    The Aikoku Maru and her sister ships comprising ‘Sentai 24’ had a short, but illustrious military career serving as heavily armed merchant raiders off the sea lanes between Australia and Latin/South America; finally serving with German merchant raiders in the Java/Indian Ocean areas. From April of 1942 until the middle of 1943, she was involved in the sinking and/or capture of the British battleship Ramilles, cargo ship Elysia, cargo ship Genoa, and the cargo ship Hauraki (to be re-named the Hoki Maru, and also sunk at Truk Lagoon). Overall, she and her sister ship, the Hokoku Maru claim to have sunk 23 Allied merchant ships totaling 183,612 tons. On July 11th 1943 she reports being hit by three torpedoes fired by the USS Halibut while enroute to Truk from Yokosuka. On July 16th 1943 she was attacked by the USS Tinosa that fired 3 torpedoes, but none of them hit the ship.

    The Aikoku Maru arrived at Truk Lagoon shortly before Operation Hailstorm carrying part of the Japanese Army’s 1st Amphibious Brigade. While anchored just east of Dublon Island on February 17th 1944, she was attacked by planes from the USS Intrepid and USS Essex that hit her with 500-lb. bombs causing her to explode violently and sink immediately. Japanese versions report that a Grumman aircraft crashed near the bridge of the ship causing a big pillar of fire and smoke resulting in a large explosion. These sources also list the number of army troops killed at 730 together with 11 of the ship’s crew.

    She rests on an even keel with the superstructure at 130ft/40m, deck at 160ft/48m and the sea bottom at 210ft/64m. The foreship has literally been blown away. Anti aircraft guns sit atop the aft deckhouse and her stern gun still points upwards.

    (Excerpts reprinted with permission from World War II Wrecks of the Truk Lagoon by Dan E. Bailey)

  • Hoyo Maru – Tanker, capsized when sunk and lies upside down with back broken. Engine room damaged, but accessible. Hull is covered in hard corals.

    Depth:9-100ft/3-30m

    475' (145m), 8,691-ton Naval Tanker built in 1936 as a commercial oiler and requisitioned by the Japanese Navy in 1941. The ship was struck by a torpedo and a fire erupted on November 6th, 1943. The ship made it back to Truk where it was undergoing repairs when it was bombed again on February 17, 1944 by planes from the carriers USS Enterprise and USS Yorktown CV10. The ship capsized and sank with the loss of six crewmen.

  • Hokuyo Maru – Passenger freighter sitting upright, with interesting bridge and engine room.

    Depth: 140-210ft/42-64m

    368' (112m), 4,739-ton Passenger-Cargo Ship served the Far East until the war, when she became a Naval Miscellaneous Auxiliary Ship. She was carrying cement bags when she was torpedoed to the sea floor during Operation Hailstone. Little is known about this ship or her pre-Truk Lagoon actions.

  • Kikukawa Maru – Passenger cargo ship. Blown apart by huge explosion – only the front half remains, which is upside down. Holds have many airplane parts and fuel drums.

    Depth: 70-125ft/22-38m

  • Hino Maru 2 – Small cargo ship, sitting upright. Heavily damaged but bow gun still visible in shallow water.

    Depth: 9-60ft/3-18m

  • Eisen No.761 – 300 ton tugboat sitting upright listing to port.

    Depth: 35-60ft/11-18m

  • Reiyo Maru – Passenger cargo ship sitting upright. Holds mostly empty, engine room is spacious.

    Depth: 170-220ft/50-65m

    The Reiyo Maru was a 400ft/121m, 5,446-ton Passenger-Cargo Ship built in 1920 for the small sized shipping line Toyo K.K. (Oriental Shipping Co, Ltd.) based in Tokyo. The company was established in 1896, and she provided passenger, cargo and general tramping services from the Orient to New York and from Yokohama to South China ports. The word ‘Maru’ designates a merchant vessel.

    This large passenger–cargo ship was an older three-island type with an extended island amidships, a split superstructure, a plumb bow, and a counter stern. A pair of small kingposts were used with a small hatch that divides the bridge and amidships superstructure. The ship’s masts, positioned between cargo hold pairs fore and aft, had an unusual inverted crosstree at their top.

    In the initial war years, the Reiyo Maru was assigned duties transferring troops for the Japanese Army. She was listed as an Army “A” ship as late as October 5th 1943, and was carrying 1,592 troops at the time. Her affiliation with the Japanese Navy became apparent the following month when she was part of the 5-ship Convoy No. 3128 that departed Yokosuka for Truk Lagoon on November 28th 1943 carrying miscellaneous provisions, tools, bombs, coal, landing craft and 283 passengers. Convoy No. 3128 lost the Kenryu Maru during the trip to the U.S. submarine USS Snapper. After leaving Truk for Rabaul, she was scheduled to return to Truk before proceeding on to Yokosuka.

    Early in the morning on February 17th 1944 she was hit by American dive bombers from the USS Essex which scored two 1,000 lb. direct hits - one amidships and the other just aft of the bridge. Some 10 minutes later, planes from the USS Intrepid scored a direct hit just aft of the bridge amidships and a near miss off the stern quarter. Fires started in the holds and spread to the bowels of the ship until they reached hold no. 2 where munitions caught fire and multiple explosions occurred. She sank two days later. Eight crewmen died in the bombing attacks and resulting fires and explosions.

    The ship lies close to an even keel with depth to the top of the mid-ship superstructure at 155ft/47m, depth to the deck ranging from 185-195ft/56-59m with the sea bottom at 210ft/64m. The wreck is one of the deepest wrecks in Truk Lagoon, and due to its depth, little growth is apparent, and it is not often dived.

    (Excerpts reprinted with permission from World War II Wrecks of the Truk Lagoon by Dan E. Bailey)

  • Taiho Maru – Freighter, lying in 2 sections. Bow is upside down; stern on port side. Many fuel drums and 2 landing craft nearby.

    Depth: 90-145ft/27-44m

  • Shotan Maru – Freighter sitting upright with trucks, ammunition, oil/gasoline drums, AA and stern gun.

    Depth: 120-180ft/35-55m

    The Shotan Maru was a 285 ft/86m, 1,999-ton cargo steam ship built in 1943; one of the class of 14 ships built between 1942 and 1944 by private shipyards as part of the Standard type ID program. The commercial owner was the Matsuoka Kisen shipping company which operated out of Kobe and Hiogo-ken. Upon completion she was transferred immediately to the Imperial Japanese Navy (IJN). The word ‘Maru’ designates a merchant vessel.

    The first mention of the Shotan Maru in intelligence files was in Sept 1943, indicating that she had departed Sasebo for Kwajalein via Yokosuka and Truk. Later reports showed her to be in Kwajalein in October and on November 6th she entered Truk Lagoon’s south pass, escorted by SubChaser No.33.

    In early January 1944 she returned again to Truk Lagoon – this time travelling from Yokosuka with a cargo including 100 belly tanks for Zero fighter planes. Her last arrival into Truk Lagoon was on February 6th as part of Convoy #2312 from Rabaul escorted by the Matsutkaze and Fumitsuki.

    The Shotan Maru was attacked by Douglas Dauntless dive bombers from the USS Enterprise on February 18th. Heavy damage was reported from a bomb hit just aft of amidships. She sank quickly close to the island of Fanamu – it’s speculated the crew were intending to try to beach her.

    The Shotan Maru sits upright in 180ft/55m of water, at the base of an underwater hill that extends up to Fanamu Island. There are 2 truck frames on the top of Hold 1; the third was blown over the port side and rests on the sand. Inside the front holds there are many beer bottles, ammunition (4 packs of 3 inch artillery shells), a large portable generator, fuel drums, cement bags and ink bottles. Aft of the superstructure anti aircraft guns have fallen through the deck, and sit one level down. The well preserved engine room is accessible from the superstructure. In the heavily damaged aft holds you can find china saki carafes, plates, china cups and several wheelbarrows. There is a gun on the stern and also an emergency steering helm.

    (Excerpts reprinted with permission from World War II Wrecks of the Truk Lagoon by Dan E. Bailey)

  • This aircraft transport has come to represent the wonders of the sunken Japanese fleet more than any other ship lying in the Lagoon. It is 434 feet long and 7,000 tons with 6-inch bow guns. The uppermost portion of the ship rests at 40 feet; the starboard torpedo hole lies at 115 feet. Interesting artifacts, beautiful coral, and diverse marine life make the Fujikawa the most exciting shipwreck to dive.


Truk Wreck Diving

Truk Stop Hotel and Truk Lagoon Dive Center
P.O. Box 546, Chuuk State,
Federated States of Micronesia 96942 
(691) 330-4232/4233/4285/4286 - 330-7990 – Reservations only
TrukStop.com | Dive-TrukLagoon.com | TrukWreckDiving.com